FAIL (the browser should render some flash content, not this).

Email Newsletter

Sign up to receive our
Email Newsletter






Mick Rich Contractors | Solving Complexity With Creativity

An Albuquerque, New Mexico general contractor, Mick Rich Construction specializes in medium scale commercial building projects in all phases of construction: new construction, building renovations, special unique construction, tilt-up construction, and design-build. To serve our clients' needs, we also have a service department for repairs and alterations.

Mick Rich defies trend, looks for out-of-state work

During the recession, New Mexico’s contractors have compressed, while out-of-state firms have expanded into the Land of Enchantment looking for projects. Mick Rich, however, has gone against the grain.

Blog #147 Ventilation Systems

Ventilation systems need love too.

Most of us are never aware of exhaust fans. Out of sight, out of mind. But that does not mean they don’t need maintenance.

Blog #146 A Building Mystery

Last week, a structural engineer asked me to accompany him on a review of abuilding with “issues.”

Players
Principal, Maintenance Man, Environmental Expert, Environmental Contractor, Structural Engineer, and I.

I wondered where I fit in this mix. The Principal said that she had heard good things about Mick Rich Contractors, and that she had seen our job site sign on the highway from Farmington.

Everyone shared observations and thoughts, and the meeting ended. I have enjoyed reading PD James and Agatha Christy, and this building had all the characteristics of a good mystery.

Blog #145 Thermostats

The renovation of my home is coming to a close. (My friends and family deny that my home will ever be finished.) One of the last items to replace is the heating and cooling controls. So while watching TV, I have begun researching thermostats.

Blog #144 It’s the plumber... I’ve come to fix your sink

Why are so many plumbers driving around Albuquerque? And why are there so many advertisements for plumbing contractors? Can there be that much work for their services?

Most people have the confidence to take on simple home repairs and remodels, such as repainting a wall or re-caulking a window. But when it comes to plumbing, they are not just hesitant, but fearful. Is the fear unwarranted? Water can cause great damage in a hurry.

Blog #143 - An Update on My Son

On Friday, Pete Williams of Mountain States Cranes called me to ask about opportunities on the neighborhood Walmart store construction that we recently started. He asked me who is the steel erector. I told him, and we talked about "swinging" the mechanical units on the roof. He asked who the mechanical contractor is, and I did not know the answer.

I ended the conversation with, “You should stop by the project and meet with the project manager to discuss who is doing what.”

Pete asked, "Who is the PM?"

I responded, “Jim Rich.”

Blog #142: Quality means different things to different people

We recently completed a project for Casa Angelica. The budget was tight (which is normal), and their need was great. Casa Angelica cares for young residents who are severely physically handicapped, developmentally disabled, and visually impaired. Some residents live at Casa Angelica full time, and some spend only their days there. Our project was to create a small campus setting by upgrading three old portable classrooms.

Blog #141 – Quality, Part 4

This week I attended a Walmart contractor conference. It was interesting to peek inside a huge company and learn a bit about how it got to where it is today. I also learned how we can work better within Walmart’s system, and how our company can improve. It was well worth the time and expense to travel to Bentonville, Arkansas.

The conference opened with a Vice President sharing a few thoughts. This one stuck with me: “All jobs are temporary. No one stays forever.” The key word was “temporary.”
A job is not everything.
A job does not define us.

Blog #140 – Quality, Part Three

As part of being a contractor and loving my work, our family talks a lot about construction. My wife is a pharmacist, one daughter is a physician’s assistant, and the other daughter is a physical therapist, so we also have long discussions about medicine. (I consider myself a tough guy, but toughness stops shy of looking at cadavers and surgeries.) I can better understand medical discussions when I relate the human body to building systems. This analogy extends to the quality of medical care / medical malpractice related to quality of construction / latent construction defects.

Blog #139 Quality, Part 2

Quality is no mistake. To achieve quality, it must be a more than a priority; it must be a core value – showing up in everything you do, every decision you make.

But for some companies, poor quality is no mistake, either. Quality is consciously and intentionally ignored or overridden by other considerations, usually greed or laziness.